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Cheryl Micciche ~ 15 Kathrene Ct

Half buried in sand, rocks, and pebbles, it took a good hour of digging by hand to free the arched driftwood from its unrelenting owner – the shores of Lake Ontario at Webster Park.  This sculpture quality driftwood was the inspiration for our backyard water feature and garden. 

What followed were dozens of trips to and from local building sites, collecting rocks of all shapes, sizes and weight to line the pond floor, walls and perimeter.   

Further trips to Webster Park and the shores of Lake Ontario yielded a 200 lb. rock birdbath, fossilized root rocks, a beautiful naturally-sculpted driftwood planter, timbers to form a backyard gateway, and two additional driftwood sculptures, set on end in the ground.  It was a summer of constant gifts from nature.

That was the summer of 2006.  Since then, plantings of hosta, ornamental grasses and daylilies share the bed surrounding the pond.  Koi, goldfish and an occasional frog or two swim and bask in the twinkling sunlight under the protective watch of a London plane tree.  Sit, relax and enjoy.  It’s a little piece of heaven – right in our own backyard.

This Garden was featured in the 2010 Rochester Civic Garden Tour.

Dara Donaghy Smith ~ 14 Southwick Drive

My husband and I purchased our house six years ago.  The first year I spent just watching the gardens to see what kind of show they would put on.  The yard had a couple of flower beds but they were small with a lot of perennials that just took over the areas that they were in.  That winter I designed the coming season’s gardens.  The first thing to go was the 1956 hedge row that lined the front of the house.  My husband also spent that summer adding a brick pathway.  This project took up the entire summer but it came out beautiful and was worth all the hard work.  The following summers were spent removing plants and adding more of a variety of perennials.  Some of my favorites are daisies, black eyed susans, and hostas. 

 

A few years back she and her neighbor and good friend, Rebecca Waston, under took and extensive project of combining a garden between the two yards.  We combined a shade patio amongst our pine trees in the back yard.  Both husbands were skeptical if this deck would be used.  But the first two people to enjoy the shaded deck were the two husbands!  The four of us spent many evenings enjoying dinner out on our shade deck.  The Weston side holds the patio table and chairs and the Smith side holds the conversational seating area.  Both sides were used extensively by both houses.  Rebecca and I also combined the gardens so that they flowed into each others yard.  It gives the whole site a continuity that works spectacularly all summer long.

Rebecca Weston ~18 Southwick Drive

Last summer we refered to Rebecca as an absentee gardener. Although her fingerprints are all over her back yard, she had been spending much of her time in NYC, concentrating on passing the N.Y. State Bar exam. Her classes unfortunately took her to the Big Apple so she left her lovely gardens to the loving and capable hands of her good friend and next door neighbor, Dara

This summer Rebecca is back in town and she's been weeding and trimming, planting and pruning and it shows - as nary a weed can be seen.

Probably the most prevalent flower is the old stand-by hosta yet between the two homes you will find almost every perennial known to this part of the state.

Morning glories, hydrangeas, summer spirea, black-eyed Susans, sedum, Shasta daisies, chives, cushion spurge, green envy cone flowers and double-decker cone flowers, perennial geraniums, even rhubarb,

 Rebecca is a lover of roses and peonies and her gardens are dominated by many of these. She also has small stepping stones throughout her gardens and has artistically painted the name of the flower on each. She also made lovely stepping stones in the shape of leaves.

 

Paul and Sonya Piotrowski ~ 135 Dunning Avenue

“My interest in gardening began back when I was a child helping in my parent’s garden.  My garden is sun to shade areas around the yard tilled with bulbs, perennials and shrubs.  The garden has changed and grown since purchasing this home in 1989 with only yews in the front.”

“I look for plants that are interesting and provide the colors I want.  There are many varieties of hostas, geraniums, daylilies, lilies, Heucheras, clematis, hydrangea, and more. 

The garden is a work in progress since I am usually moving and rearranging the plants looking for combinations or trying to fit another plant in.  The garden is there to attract wildlife and enjoy throughout the seasons.

Dan & Kathy Smith ~ 100 Dunning Avenue

Our gardens provide an escape and place of relaxation for us after a busy day.  Our goal was o build a private vacation spot in our own back yard rather than spending time and money traveling to one.  We enjoy a variety of annuals and perennials throughout our gardens using pots and flower beds. 

Recently we made the gardens more managable by surrounding them with hardscape rock walls in order to keep the weeds out and the mulch in.  Over the years we have incorporated into our yard a pool, deck, paver patio, garden bench, fireplace and waterfall which are surrounded by gardens of flowers and ortamental grasses. 

We love spending time in our space and entertaining friends.  We hope you will enjoy our space too!

Nancy & Ray Ferris ~ 77 Park Avenue

 

My garden is all about color.  I use annuals and perennials to create a painters palette.  Come and walk the paths and enjoy a garden that will make your eyes smile

Dot & Jerry Smart, 73 Park Avenue

"As a member of the Rochester Butterfly Club, I always plant the garden with butterflies (and hummingbirds) in mind.

In the ‘what’s new’ department, I’m trying ZOWIE! Zinnia this year, reported to be a great butterfly attractor.  Perhaps we will be lucky enough to spot a Giant Swallowtail (wingspan up to 51/2”) again this year."

"Vegetable and seed sales are up over 20% this year and in keeping with the sustainability movement I have planted more veggies along with parsley for the Black Swallowtails.

 Stop over and see sure-fire simple ways to keep cutworms off the tomatoes, slugs from decapitating your pepper plants and an organic way of keeping slugs from turning your hosta leaves into cut-lace work.  Learn how to keep those pesky squirrels off the bird feeder forever."

Bob & Lynne Barton ~ 50 Elm Street

The front yard garden of Lynn and Bob's house was created eight years ago. 

The property when they purchased the home in 1991 had only some red tulips in the front growing between shrubs.

 

Gradually a garden started to appear and grew alittle bit each year.  Five years ago Lynn and Bob dug up the remainder of the front yard and planted perennials.  A small path with a bench complete the garden.  Many of the plants have been shared and spread throughout the neighborhood.

Claire Heinrichs ~ 100 South Avenue

We started our gardening efforts three years ago.  The bushes on the side of the house were so large they covered the windows. The first thing I did was dig up every single weed out there.  Many of them were taller than I am.  There was a gorgeous flowering crab on the side of our house with a climbing rose bush that grew to the top of the tree.  Both bloomed at the same time in the spring.  It was lovely.  Unfortunately, the tree was cut down to make way for a small deck for my mother who came to live with us after my father passed away. I cried the day they took that tree down.  After mom passed away, I started gardening in an effort to heal from the loss of both my parents.  We started planting everything from scratch, including the lawn. 

A few years back I decided we should put a patio in the back yard.  I plan to border the entire patio with hydrangeas.  There will be an additional small patio added to the side of our house, and I plan to border it with lots of color.  There is a bulb garden along the sidewalk.  I figured out how to thwart the squirrels from eating my bulbs.  There is a long stretch of fencing under the dirt that they cannot get through, or at least so far.

We planted climbing roses in my favorite shade of pink.  They have now nearly reached the second story deck.  Most of our plants are young and concentrated in the front of the house for all of our neighbors who take a walk through the village every day.  We hope that you will enjoy our gardens when you come by and watch them grow with us.  We will be adding many more plants in the back yard after our patio border has been completed.  There are many, many new lilac bushes along the side near the front of the house, including some of the more rare yellow.  I hope you will all come back next year to see them bloom.

William & Jane Stata ~ 121 Fuller Avenue

 

We garden on a corner lot which means most views are open to the public all the time. A handmade fence is the weathered gray backdrop for a perennial and shrub border behind the house. Out in the front circle garden, (which used to house a huge blue spruce) zebra grasses are surrounded by butterfly bushes and black-eyed susans; it's a favorite destination for birds, bugs, and butterflies.

While I enjoy the divine design serendipity of most volunteer plants and allow meadow rue, columbine, forget-me-nots and rose campion to weave through the gardens at will, I'm currently doing pick-axe battle with lilies of the valley and purple crown vetch. I embrace change as plants fail or outgrow their space. My gardens hold nothing fancy or rare - just the beautiful variety of Rochester-hardy plants.

 

 

In addition, two small raised beds at the end of the driveway hold a variety of edibles. Tomatoes, parsnips, carrots and herbs are traditional, but this season I'm adding bok choy. I find gardening to be a hopeful pastime ( there's always next season) and I continue to be happily astounded at the knowledge that each plant's seeds knows it is to grow up after its own kind!
 

Gini Garrell ~ 44 Gordon Park

Several years ago I collaborated with my good friend Betsy Knapp about adding flowers to my yard. It has been a work in progress ever since.  She started in the front next to the creek tumbled blue stone walk my middle son and I had put down. Notice my "water feature" in that area. You could call it a reflecting pool.  She continued along both sides of the driveway. After that the garden beside the garage was created. Three years ago I put an addition on my home which necessitated plantings to continue across the front and down the east side. Here and there as time permitted she worked her way around the deck and across the back lot line. 

Last fall and this spring our attention has been on the "stumpery" on the back of the house.  I had a pallet of stone that matched the walk to rebuild the front entrance.  When it couldn't be used for that Betsy used it to build the little curved sitting wall that runs along the stump garden.  We have lots more ideas and lots more to do.  It has been great fun.  One year she piled a lot of brush cuttings along the side of the garage nobody sees but just in case someone did, she spray painted it  green!

 

John & Pam Stewart, 26 Fuller Avenue

We purchased the house at 26 Fuller Avenue in January 1979.  In the spring of 1979 we found we owned a rose garden and had acquired wonderful neighbors (Beth and Vic Marra) who were avid growers of flowers (Beth) and vegetables (Vic).  My husband John was familiar with gardening and previously worked a short time in landscaping.  I, on the other hand, had never planted, trimmed or cultivated anything, but I do love flowers.  I set a goal to have fresh cut flowers on my desk at work from spring to fall. 

 

Through the years with much work and much help and advice I achieved my initial goal.  Some of the plants have special stories while others are just purchases to fill in an empty space in the garden or the calendar.  Daffodils, tulips, lilacs, poppies, peonies, roses, painted daisies, lilies, daisies, hydrangeas, dahlias, hibiscus, black eyed susan, and mums are all there waiting their turn to create smiles both outside in the garden and inside in a vase

 

129 Dunning Ave., Keith and Amelia Rickard

Keith, Amelia and their three children moved to the Webster village in March 2010.  Their home was built in 1916.  They are learning what plants they have and how to care for them.  The large front porch is flanked with two Japanese fringe maples.  The back yard features a beautiful stonescape patio. 

A pergola with wisteria opens out to the back yard and the childrens’ play area.  The stonescape features raised beds with perennials.  They are just learning the names of the plants.  Some of these are hostas, climbing hydrangea, black-eyed Susans, coral bells, hollyhocks, roses, clematis and lilies. 

 

William & Carol Carreo ~  224 Curtice Park

From April to October Bill has over 60 varieties, with some 3,000 individual plants.  From early spring to mid-summer there are azaleas, iris, poppies, blue/white bells, primrose, roses, tulips, daffodils, honey suckle, weeping cherry and crocus... just to name a few.

 

From July to October he enjoys the  rose of sharon, mums, lilies, hydrangea, hibiscus, sunflowers, daisies, cosmos, marigold, hosta, bamboo, holley, black eye susan, and yellow bud to name a few more.

 He also has raspberries, tomatoes, zucchini, winter squash and a variety of herbs.

Overall Bill mulches all leaves & clippings etc. for use in the garden in an effort to keep it organic he uses only organic fertilizer; no weed killer and no insecticides

 

Bill believes that gardening should help one develop a sense of peacefulness with nature, and it should be considered fun – not work.  His hope is that this notion comes across to all those who visit his gardens.

 

Dot & Jerry Smart, 73 Park Avenue

 "As a member of the Rochester Butterfly Club, I always plant the garden with butterflies (and hummingbirds) in mind.

In the ‘what’s new’ department, I’m trying ZOWIE! Zinnia this year, reported to be a great butterfly attractor.  Perhaps we will be lucky enough to spot a Giant Swallowtail (wingspan up to 51/2”) again this year."

"Vegetable and seed sales are up over 20% this year and in keeping with the sustainability movement I have planted more veggies along with parsley for the Black Swallowtails.

 Stop over and see sure-fire simple ways to keep cutworms off the tomatoes, slugs from decapitating your pepper plants and an organic way of keeping slugs from turning your hosta leaves into cut-lace work.  Learn how to keep those pesky squirrels off the bird feeder forever."

 

Phil & Judy Sinaguglia

231 Champion Ave

 

Phil has been an avid gardener for many years.  His gardens include many colorful perennials; such as clematis, flowering shrubs, astibules, daylilies, hostas all supplemented with annuals. 

Lush gardens of pachysandra surround much of the house.  Decorative curbing encircles many of the front gardens.  There is a cozy corner with a bench for reading or resting among the hydrangea and a young Japanese maple. 

 

Phil and Judy’s gardens are informal and have grown in area every year.  They are an ever-changing work in progress.  Besides the many varieties of flowers and plants; there are many small whimsical garden statues placed for the viewers’ enjoyment.

 

 

Mahlon & Sue Gebhardt

228 Judson Street

Sue and her husband, Mahlon, are the original owners (over 40 years) of this colonial style home. About 10 years ago, Sue became an avid gardener.  It all started with a neighbor-friendly fence in the back yard that serves as a backdrop for her extensive gardens.   

 

 

Clematis vines thrive all along the fence.  Sue’s favorite flowers are the many lilies that she purchases from a nursery in Missouri.  Small animals, birds, and neighbors, enjoy the Gebhardt’s back yard.

 

 

Dina Tome, 1014 Krieger Road

 

Behind her home at the corner of Phillips and Krieger is a little peace of Paradise.  Dina Tome has taken a small spot in this world to create a small haven.  The creativity she has put into her garden has blossomed as well as the many plants she has. 

 

She has devoted herself to making the world a more beautiful and serene place, the kind that you can find true tranquility in.  Dina has fallen in love with her talent, and has put her heart and soul into growing beautiful flowers for the world to see. 

  

 

Paul and Sonya Piotrowski

135 Dunning Avenue

 

“My interest in gardening began back when I was a child helping in my parent’s garden.  My garden is sun to shade areas around the yard tilled with bulbs, perennials and shrubs.  The garden has changed and grown since purchasing this home in 1989 with only yews in the front.”

 

“I look for plants that are interesting and provide the colors I want.  There are many varieties of hostas, geraniums, daylilies, lilies, Heucheras, clematis, hydrangea, and more. 

The garden in a work in progress since I am usually moving and rearranging the plants looking for combinations or trying to fit another plant in.  The garden is there to attract wildlife and enjoy throughout the seasons.”

         

Susan & Mario Gianforte

160 Champion Ave

From early spring to late fall a huge family of perennials color the yard of the Gianforte family.

“Our home is on a corner lot, which always makes me feel like the yard has three front yards.  I have always tried to make each side of your yard beautiful for our neighbors to view.”

Early blooming bulbs such as snowdrops, hyacinth, daffodils, crocus, and tulips make room for irises in purple, white, yellow and lavender.  Then peonies, lupines, blue spikes of delphiniums and poppies emerge.  There is bee balm, phlox, and clumps of feverfew, Shasta daises, black-eyed susans, and mountain bluet to name just a few.

Colorful daylilies, hollyhocks, foxglove, cosmos, balloon flowers, astilbe veronica, clematis, and several varieties of hosta plants grace the shady areas along with spiderwort.  There are many rose bushes and flowering shrubs throughout.  Tucked in between the flowers you will find some berry plants and vegetables growing. 

Many years of dividing plants have gone into making new garden beds in our yard, along with exchanging and sharing plants with our friends.  No one who visits goes away without a plant from our garden. 

All birds, bees, butterflies, and litter critters are welcome!

Tom & Heidi Smith

85 Fuller Avenue

Gardening, for Heidi, is a true celebration.  It supports her compulsion to organize and feeds her passion to create.  She is continually amazed when someone views her garden and expresses awe that such a space actually exists behind the fence.

Heidi's love of gardening is exemplified by two quotes.  "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in garden overalls and looks like work." (Thomas A. Edison)  "And when your back stops aching and your hands begine to harden...you will find yourself a partner in the Glory of the Garden." (Rudyard Kipling)

 

The garden at 77 Park Avenue is the work of

Nancy and Ray Ferris.

Nancy’s brother and sister are professional artists, but Nancy prefers to use her garden as her canvas.  Color means everything!  She mixes annuals and perennials to make that possible.  She adds that there are never enough flowers! “This is a must see”

garden that will be enjoyed by tourers.  Nancy's garden is one of the most art-filled, colorful gardens you will see on the tour.  She is a year round garden who starts all of her flowers from seed. 

There will be a surprise for children

Gordon & Kathryn Clarke

136 Dunning Avenue

 

Although the back yard is reserved for kids and dogs, Gordon’s playground is the front yard.  Gordon inherited the gardening gene from his mother who still gardens and provides many of the flowers you’ll see from her small green house located on Keuka Lake.  Gordon spends early spring haling fieldstone from the local farmer’s fields to create walkways and walls. 

His gardens are inspired by the American countryside and accented with ornamental trees and shrubs.  The two small ornamental maples you’ll see in the Clarke’s yard were a gift from local scout pack 112 for the Clarke’s volunteer work with them.  Gordon is a local singer/songwriter and you’ll often find he and Kathy sitting out front, enjoying the gardens and passersby, as Gordon strums one of his many stringed instruments.

Sandy and Steve Joyce

47 Dunning Avenue

 “When we moved in this house five years ago, this corner lot lacked any curb appeal….the garden was overgrown and barely there.  Our white picket fence runs on all four sides of this corner lot which allows people to see my gardens.  It is landscaped with a rock border that frames the gardens. 

 

There are a variety of perennials planted carefully so I always have something blooming at some point in the summer.  I am constantly surprised how the gardens look more mature with each year.  To me gardening is so therapeutic from the many long months of winter we have.  It is a true joy for me to be able to work along side mother nature. The best thing for me personally is that my gardens evolve each year and are never done.   It is a constant work in progress.  Things are always moving in, out or over in my garden.”

 

Click here to view the gardens featured from 2008

 

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